Changing the Rules: new powers for workers, or for institutions?

In this podcast I discuss some clues about behind the scenes discussions between leaders of the ACTU and the ALP. Right now, behind the scenes meetings are discussing the new industrial and workplace relations rules that might be introduced by a new ALP government. This activity will continue right up to ALP National Conference in December, and afterwards.

Our focus is on a recent speech by ACTU Secretary Sally McManus, and a recent interview with ALP spokesperson for Workplace Relations, Brendan O’Connor. These provide some clues about whats happening now.

We also discuss: is this something that activists in the Change Rules campaign should discuss and speak up about?

A reasoned debate on casualisation?! Give us a break

The Business Review Today (online) posted this today about casualisation: http://www.brw.com.au/p/leadership/workforce_casualisation_the_discussion_e6DEzUdUr5NFkzQCaEjhOJ 

This was my comment:

I cant believe how naive this is is. How unctuous. How incredibly slow to get in tune, Stephen (Koukoulas) is. Who is this “we” that needs to have a debate / a discussion. “Reasoned”? “Apolitical”? Are you serious? A debate in its “infancy”? Give us all a break! The union movement have been “discussing”, negotiating, dare I say “struggling” against employers and governments to get “causalisation” under some control for 30 years, at least. This struggle is deeply rooted in our whole history going back 200 plus years. Not so long ago, there was the ACTU commissioned report led by Brian Howe, ie “Lives on Hold”. Any chance that you Stephen, apparently an esteemed academic, might actually know about, refer to, acknowledge it. Most bosses love the way the working class is structured these days. I suspect the main reform business wants is the reduction / removal of the casual loading. If they can get away with it, most don’t pay it any way.